New England Garden Journal – July Part 1

Standard
Wild carrot or Queen Anne's Lace growing in my terraced bed. Great for attracting pollinators and butterflies.

Wild carrot or Queen Anne’s Lace growing in my terraced bed. Great for attracting pollinators and butterflies.

I have had little energy for my garden and have even allowed my little plants to go days without watering during this dry spell. Somehow everything is alive, though not necessarily thriving except for the beans and corn — now I know why people love growing beans and corn.

The last three days I have watered as needed. The rain is just not falling. My radishes grew a couple of inches overnight from their watering (or so it seems) and are forming bulbs, and the squash seemed to catch their breath for a strong push forward. This morning I fertilized the squash, cucumbers, and struggling tomatoes.

Planted

  • Bloomsdale Spinach in back garden – partially shady spot – will harvest as baby spinach so not worried about it bolting
  • Heirloom Sweet corn – sowed in spots that never came up and along outside edge
  • Mammoth sunflower – in milkweed patch
  • Black Beauty Zucchini – in back yard – decided to grow zucchini instead of potatoes
  • More Suyo Long cucumbers – germination rate is very low for these
  • Cherokee Trail of Tears Black beans – bean teepee in back yard

I know it seems really late to be sowing seeds, and it is by a few weeks, but we had some pretty cool weather in June, so I am hoping that the seeds sown today will grow quicker in the summer heat we have been experiencing the last week or so.  I know beans don’t germinate well when it is wet and cool, and zucchini do not like cool weather. Fingers crossed for fast growing.

Red onions (left), snow peas (right) and newly sown spinach in the open space

Red onions (left), snow peas (right) and newly sown spinach in the open space

Dill and Suyo Long cucumber

Dill and Suyo Long cucumber

Leek plant that overwintered. Leek is a biennial so this year it will bloom.

Leek plant that overwintered. Leek is a biennial so this year it will bloom.

Sweet corn loving the hot weather!

Sweet corn loving the hot weather!

Advertisements

5 responses »

  1. Looks awesome Michele! I still have carrot seeds to plant. I think your seeds will be fine. I think we tend to plant as soon as we reasonably can in the spring and forget that we really do have time after that. Hope all is well with you!

    Like

    • There are actually some growers who delay planting squash in order to avoid the emergence of the squash borers. Hey, I might just be doing this better than before when I spent a lot of time digging out squash borers and hoping for survival of the plant. If nothing else, my corn is doing really well, and that was planted on time. I am really struggling physically, so what gets done gets done.

      Like

    • Hey, if I get anything edible it will be more than if I didn’t go ahead and try. I confess to thinking about how that sweet corn will taste, organic heirloom sweet corn. And I am thrilled that my dill seems to be doing well this year. I just sowed pickling cucumber seeds. I hope I get enough of a harvest that I can put up a few quarts of pickles for my youngest.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s