New England Garden Journal – July Part 4

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Background: I struggle with chronic fatigue and pain, and this year when it was time to start seeds indoors and then transplant out to the garden in the spring, I was struggling. My garden wasn’t started until May 31, 2014, and a good portion of it wasn’t sown until mid-June. I did not start any seeds indoors but directly sowed everything in the garden. Below is the result of this late garden, an experiment in breaking northern gardening rules. This garden is what I could handle, and it is what it is. I am not disappointed except in the peppers and tomatoes, which are so late that I might not enjoy a harvest at all this year.

My garden is planted with heirloom vegetable varieties (open pollinated) and grown organically in south central Connecticut. I haven’t used pesticides in my yard since we purchased the property in 2000.

This week: We have enjoyed a few days of rain, much of it heavy. I was a bit worried about how my garden would hold up to the pounding rain at one point. Looks like the wind did a little damage in the heirloom corn patch.

Discovered a broken corn stalk this morning. No animals tracks, so assuming wind did this damage.

Discovered a broken corn stalk this morning. No animals tracks, so assuming wind did this damage.

The rest of the garden seems to have benefited from the warm summer rains.

Lots of delicious snow peas. I sowed three areas with snow peas this year.

Lots of delicious snow peas. I sowed three areas with snow peas this year.

Harvested first Suyo Long cucumber of the season. It is about 16" long.

Harvested first Suyo Long cucumber of the season. It is about 16″ long.

Zucchini plants have tripled in size in one week.

Zucchini plants have tripled in size in one week.

Spinach, red leaf lettuce, a zucchini transplant, red onions and snow peas in the back.

Spinach, red leaf lettuce, Romaine lettuce, a zucchini transplant, red onions and snow peas in the back.

Lemon squash plants blooming in terraced garden.

Lemon squash plants blooming in terraced garden.

Terraced bed with lemon squash, giant nasturtium, radishes, and a single tomato transplant (which is hidden by the squash)

Terraced bed with lemon squash, giant nasturtium, radishes, and a single tomato transplant (which is hidden by the squash)

Bell pepper plants will most likely not produce before the first freeze

Bell pepper plants will most likely not produce before the first freeze

Tomatoes in grow bags beside driveway are finally taking off. Now to see if they have time to actually produce any tomatoes before cold weather arrives.

Tomatoes in grow bags beside driveway are finally taking off. Now to see if they have time to actually produce any tomatoes before cold weather arrives.

Cherokee Trail of Tears black beans enjoying the early morning sun

Cherokee Trail of Tears black beans enjoying the early morning sun

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7 responses »

    • That cucumber was so sweet. It was gone within minutes. My cucumber bed is full of Suyo Longs in various sizes. We will be enjoying cucumbers for the rest of the summer. Now if my picking cucumbers would take off, I will be happy cause my pickle-loving son needs his fermented pickles — the kind with healthy probiotics. Can’t wait!

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  1. Randy loves cukes and I do too…yummo! Of course a lil kosher sea salt. My mouth is watering right now. Hummm maybe I should go and get some today.

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    • Hothouse cucumbers (really long, often expensive) are very similar to Suyo Long cucumbers. When not trellised, Suyo Longs grow in a curve. When trellised, they hang from their stems and end up straight. They taste the same, either way. Yummy!

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  2. Still thinking about cukes. I didnt pickup any today…so sad. I was thinking about them dipping into thousand island dressing. Man ol man so freaking great. I did pick up the sea salt, but thats not gonna do me any good. I guess ill make some egg and cheese biscuits. Good alternative but not as healthy.

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